Downsizing the Federal Government

Cato Institute
Cato.org

The federal government is running huge budget deficits, spending too much, and heading toward a financial crisis. Without a change of direction in Washington, average working families will be faced with large tax increases and a lower standard of living.

This website is designed to help policymakers and the public understand where federal spending goes and how to reform each government department. It describes the failings of agencies and identifies specific programs to cut. And it discusses the systematic reasons why government programs are often obsolete, mismanaged, or otherwise dysfunctional…
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Nutrition Subcommittee Holds Hearing to Review SNAP Recipient Characteristics and Dynamics

2/26/15

Today, Rep. Jackie Walorski (IN-2), Chairwoman of the House Agriculture Committee’s Subcommittee on Nutrition, held a public hearing to review the characteristics and dynamics of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients. [SNAP is the former Food Stamp Program.] The committee will conduct a full-scale review this Congress in order to improve and strengthen the program for its intended recipients. This hearing follows yesterday’s full committee hearing on the past, present, and future of SNAP…
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(The following are several excerpts from links included in the above press release. – Admin.)
* [SNAP is] the largest welfare program in both the number of recipients and the amount of spending, yet the program lacks a clear mission and the data reveals that it is not helping lift people out of poverty. (This and the next comment come from different sources. – Admin)
*SNAP has become one of the most effective antipoverty programs overall, especially at lifting non-elderly households with children out of deep poverty.
*Currently 18 different programs provide food assistance, and while many of them do not fall within this committee’s jurisdiction, they do serve SNAP recipients. In addition, a range of low-income benefit programs are offered at the local, state and federal levels.  On top of that, a web of non-profits and community service providers exist to provide assistance.
* SNAP provided benefits to 46.5 million people in an average month in fiscal year 2014, slightly down from 47.6 million people in an average month in fiscal year 2013. The average monthly benefit in fiscal year 2014 was also down to $125 per person from $133 per person in fiscal year 2013.
*Today, 1 in 7 Americans receive assistance from SNAP at a cost approaching $80 billion, making it the second largest means-tested transfer program in terms of cost after Medicaid.