What you need to know about state and federal gas taxes

The main source of transportation funding — federal and state gas taxes — has not kept up with the need IndyStar.com By Maureen Groppe, Star Washington Bureau 9/7/15 WASHINGTON – Federal and state policymakers haven’t figured out how to deal with the fact that the main source of transportation funding — federal and state gas taxes — has not kept up with the need. The details: What is the federal gas tax? The federal government imposes an 18.4 cents-per-gallon tax on gasoline and a 24.4 cents-per-gallon tax on diesel fuel. … Continue reading

My phone call from “Citizens for a Nuclear Free Iran”

By Russ Phillips

Yesterday I received a phone call from “Citizens for a Nuclear Free Iran” (CNFI) and was asked, “Do you trust Iran to live up to the agreement?”

The caller said he would report my answer to my Senator, Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) and then corrected himself and said Senator Joe Donnelly (IN). He did not mention Senator Dan Coats (IN), I assume, because he has already announced his opposition to the Iran Deal. I informed the caller I was very familiar with contacting my congressman and would register my sentiments directly to them.

Instead of answering the question, I asked several of my own. I wanted to know more about this advocacy group. After several of my questions the caller ended the conversation, still without my answer.

To help me be more informed about the issues on this topic I began some online research.

CNFI is “…dedicated to preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapons capability.” (Source)

 Evan Bayh, previously governor of Indiana and served two terms in the U.S. Senate, serves on the CNFI Advisory Board. (Source)

A recent Washington Post article, “Anti-Iran deal groups firing on all cylinders in massive lobbying push,” helps to understand the effort underway to undermine the Iran Deal.

The Historic Deal that Will Prevent Iran from Acquiring A Nuclear Weapon,” as presented by the White House and including a video (4:37) by President Obama addresses some of the most common criticisms of the Iran Deal.

For anyone seriously interested in this matter this is just a start. Best wishes in your journey of discovery.

Town Hall Meetings: When did your congressman last hold one?

By Russ Phillips

My Congresswoman (Jackie Walorski), in her second term, has not held a town hall meeting, thus far. She does meet with special interest groups as well as with businesses and industries and does regularly appear on a local radio show. However, she has not held a town hall meeting where any citizen is welcome to attend and engage her in conversation. This is most unfortunate.

In a previous article it was pointed out that the House will be in recess for eighteen weeks – yes, 18 – during this year and the Senate for thirteen weeks – yes, 13. And this does not account for individual Mondays and Fridays when sometimes they are not in session. Yet, my Congresswoman has not held even one town hall meeting.

My Congresswoman has recently announced she will be running for a third term. However, she has not announced any plans to hold a town hall meeting.

Recently I ran across the following article:

Congress out of session does not mean it isn’t working

The Government Affairs Institute at Georgetown University
By Josh Huder (Senior Fellow at the Government Affairs Institute)

The Fix blog at the Washington Post has an article arguing that since 1978, Congress has only worked a full week 14% of the time. This is a common—and extraordinarily misleading– jab at Congress. While it is easy to criticize an institution that frequently makes itself an easy target, it’s a disservice that unnecessarily undermines trust in government.

First, it oversimplifies lawmakers’ jobs. Members of Congress really have two jobs: represent their constituents and govern. These responsibilities do not always go hand in hand. Representing constituents means speaking with them in person, holding town hall meetings, organizing rallies, attending to casework, and otherwise being present in the district or state they represent. This is not easily done from a Washington office. Supporting or opposing legislation is an important part of a Member’s job. However, it does not come close to capturing Members’ range of responsibilities. This is why even when Congress is out of session, Members are at work. Most Members of Congress work a 5-6 day week. The representative aspect of Congress’s job is almost completely ignored in these statistics.

Second, the chambers rarely work in concert. The article concludes on this note: “It is hard to escape the implications of Friday being the weekday on which the House and Senate are least commonly in session.” Actually, both chambers do not need to be in session at the same time. It is not a requirement to legislate nor are the chambers routinely working on the same issues.

The House and Senate are independent, uncoordinated bodies. They work on different issues at different times and most often do not coordinate their schedules. For example, last Thursday (September 18th) the Senate passed 19 bills on its final work day of the week. Among the bills it passed were the Debbie Smith Re-authorization Act (H.R. 4323), Paul D. Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy Amendments (H.R. 594), and the Prevent Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act (H.R. 4980). Those bills passed the House on April 7th, July 28th, and July 23rd, respectively. The House did not need to be in session for those bills to pass the Senate, then go to the President. The only time the two chambers need to be in session at the same time is if there is a pending deadline Congress needs to meet (e.g. the debt ceiling, avoiding government shutdown, etc). Otherwise, being in Washington at the same time is not a prerequisite to enacting laws.

Lastly, there is no evidence to suggest more legislative days lead to more legislation. The 111th Congress was in session fewer days than the 112th Congress. Having fewer legislative days did not prevent the 111th Congress from being among the most successful in congressional history while the 112th Congress was the least productive since the Civil War. Similarly, the Senate has often worked more days than the House. However, the Senate routinely passes fewer bills than the lower chamber. It is in session longer because its legislative process requires more time for bills and motions to move through the legislative process.

Congress has a lot of problems. Being in session at the same time or holding longer work weeks isn’t one of them. The 113th Congress has been extraordinarily unproductive, but fewer days in session have little to do with that.

(Did you note in the above article, “Representing constituents means…holding town hall meetings…”? BTW, do your Congressmen and Senators hold town hall meetings? – Admin)

Rep. Walorski Opposes Funding Homeland Security, Senators Coats and Donnelly Support

By Russ Phillips
3/5/15

Yesterday President Obama signed into law the Homeland Security Appropriations Act,
2015 that had been approved by the House and Senate in recent days. Indiana’s Rep. Jackie Walorski voted to oppose the Act while Indiana Senators Dan Coats and Joe Donnelly supported the Act.

An explanation of Walorski’s vote was not found on her website. However, a Walorski staff member stated today, “The Congresswoman had hoped that a solution could be reached, the Senate again played politics with our country’s national security. Yesterday, Harry Reid and Senate Democrats blocked a vote to allow a bill, that would fund the Dept. of Homeland Security and hold the president accountable for his abuse of executive power, to go to conference and reach a workable solution. After careful consideration, she decided that she could not support the Senate passed bill  – a measure that did not halt funding for President Obama’s executive amnesty.”

Neither was a statement found on Donnelly’s website regarding his vote.

Coat’s website does include a statement about his vote.

The vote of all members of Congress will be found here.

Sen. Joe Donnelly — Indiana’s man in the middle

IndyStar.com By Matthew Tully 12/22/14 His party is about to be tossed from power in the U.S. Senate, the result of a brutal election year for Democrats, but Sen. Joe Donnelly of Indiana smiled over a plate of eggs Friday morning and said that, for him, life in the minority offers quite an opportunity. Why? Because the rules in the glacially paced Senate often require not a majority of votes, but 60 votes, for anything to move. So while Republican’s 54-seat majority might have the Fox News crowd all giddy, … Continue reading